Worlds Shittiest NVR pt. 4.

We now have a circular list of video clips in RAM, we have a way to be notified when something happens, and we now need to move the clips in RAM to permanent storage when something happens.

In part 1 we set up FFmpeg to write to files in a loop, the files were called 0.mp4, 1.mp4 … up to 9.mp4. Each file representing 10 seconds of video. We can’t move the file that FFmpeg is writing to, so we’ll do the following instead: We will copy the file previous file that FFmpeg completed, and we’ll keep doing that for a minute or so. This means that we’ll get the file (10 seconds) before the event occurred copied to permanent storage. Then, when the file that was being written while the event happened is closed, we’ll copy that file over, then the next and so on.

We’ll use a node module called “chokidar”, so, cd to your working directory (where the SMTP server code resides) and type:

node install chokidar

Chokiar lets you monitor files or directories and gives you an event when a file has been altered (in our case, FFmpeg has added data to the file). Naturall, if you start popping your own files into the RAM disk and edit those files, you’ll screw up this delicate/fragile system (read the title for clarification).

So, for example if my RAM disk is x:\ we can do this to determine which is the newest complete file:

chokidar.watch('x:\\.', {ignored: /(^|[\/\\])\../}).on('all', (event, path) => {
    
    // we're only interested in files being written to  
    if ( event != "change")  
      return;
    
    // are we writing to a new file?  
   if ( currentlyModifiedFile != path )  
   {  
      // now we have the last file created  
     lastFileCreate = currentlyModifiedFile;  
     currentlyModifiedFile = path;  
   }
});

Now, there’s a slight snag that we need to handle: Node.js’s built-in file handler can’t copy files from one device (the RAM disk) to another (HDD), so to make things easy, we grab an extension library called “fs-extra”

Not surprisingly

node install fs-extra

So, when the camera tries to send an email, we’ll set a counter to some value. We’ll then periodically check if the value is greater than zero. If it is indeed greater than zero, then we’ll copy over the file that FFmpeg just completed and decrement the counter by one.

If the value reaches 0 we won’t copy any files, and just leave the counter at 0.

Assuming you have a nice large storage drive on e:\, and the directory you’re using for permanent storage is called “nvr” we’ll set it up so that we copy from the RAM drive (x:\) to the HDD (e:\nvr). If your drive is different (it most likely is, then edit the code to reflect that change – it should be obvious what you need to change).

Here’s the complete code:

const smtp = require ( "simplesmtp");
const chokidar = require('chokidar');
const fs = require('fs-extra');

// some variables that we're going to needvar 
currentlyModifiedFile = null;
var lastFileCreate = null;
var lastCopiedFile = null;
var flag_counter = 0;
var file_name_counter = 0;

// fake SMTP server
smtp.createSimpleServer({SMTPBanner:"My Server"}, function(req) {
    req.accept();

    // copy files for the next 50 seconds (5 files)
    flag_counter = 10;
}).listen(6789);

// function that will be called every 5 seconds
// tests to see if we should copy files

function copyFiles ( )
{ 
  if ( flag_counter > 0 ) 
  { 
     // don't copy files we have already copied  
     // this will happen because we check the  
     // copy condition 2 x faster than files are being written 
     if ( lastCopiedFile != lastFileCreate ) 
     { 
        // copy the file to HDD 
        fs.copy (lastFileCreate, 'e:/nvr/' + file_name_counter + ".mp4", function(err) {     
           if ( err ) console.log('ERROR: ' + err); 
        });

        // files will be named 0, 1, 2 ... n 
        file_name_counter++;

        // store the name of the file we just copied 
        lastCopiedFile = lastFileCreate; 
     }
     
     // decrement so that we are not copying files  
     // forever 
     flag_counter--; 
  } 
  else 
  { 
     // we reached 0, there is no  
     // file that we copied before. 
     lastCopiedFile = null; 
  }
}

// set up a watch on the RAM drive, ignoring the . and .. files
chokidar.watch('x:\\.', {ignored: /(^|[\/\\])\../}).on('all', (event, path) => {
  // we're only interested in files being written to  
  if ( event != "change")  return;
   
  // are we writing to a new file?  
  if ( currentlyModifiedFile != path )  
  {  
     // now we have the last file created  
     lastFileCreate = currentlyModifiedFile;  
     currentlyModifiedFile = path;  
  }
});

// call the copy file check every 5 seconds from now on
setInterval ( copyFiles, 5 * 1000 );

So far, we’ve written about 70 lines of code in total, downloaded ImDrive, FFMpeg, node.js and a few modules (simplesmtp, chokidar and fs-extra), and we now have a pre-buffer fully in RAM and a way to store things permanently. All detection is done by the camera itself, so the amount of CPU used is very, very low.

This is the UI so far :

folders

In the next part, we’ll take a look at how we can get FFmpeg and nginx-rtmp to allow us to view the cameras on our phone, without exposing the camera directly to the internet.

 

 

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