Conway’s Law

I was re-watching this video about the (initially failed) conversion from a monolithic design of an online store, into a microservice based architecture. During the talk, Conway’s Law is mentioned. It’s one of those laws that you really should keep in mind when building software.

“organizations which design systems … are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations.”
— M. Conway

The concept was beautifully illustrated by a conversation I had recently; I was explaining why I disliked proprietary protocols, and hated the idea of having to rely on a binary library as the interface to a server. If a server uses HTTPS/JSON as it’s external interface, it allows me to use a large number of libraries – of my choice, for different platforms (*nix, windows) – to talk to the server. I can trivially test things using a common web browser. If there is a bug in any of those libraries, I can use another library, I can fix the error in the library myself (if it is OSS) etc. Basically I become the master of my own destiny.

If, on the other hand, there is a bug in the library provided to me, required to speak some bizarre proprietary protocol, then I have to wait for the vendor/organizational unit to provide a bug-fixed version of the library. In the meantime, I just have to wait. It’s also much harder to determine if the issue is in the server or the library because I may not have transparency to what’s inside the library, and I can’t trivially use a different means of testing the server.

But here’s the issue; the bug in the communication library that is affecting my module might not be seen as a high priority issue by the unit in charge of said library. It might be that the author left, and it takes considerable time to fix the issue etc. etc. this dramatically slows down progress and the time it takes to deliver a solution to a problem.

Image result for bottleneck

The strange thing is this; the idea that all communication has to pass through a single library, making the library critically important (but slowing things down) was actually 100% mirrored in the way the company communicated internally. Instead of encouraging cross team communication, there was an insistence that all communication pass through a single point of contact.

Basically, the crux is this, if the product is weird, take a look at the organization first. It might just be the case that the product is the result of a sub-optimal organizational structure.

Author: prescienta

Prescientas ruler

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s