Paranoia?

Some time ago, Bloomberg ran an article claiming that Chinese computer components (in this case a motherboard) would be intercepted en route to customers and be modified to host a small chip that would allow the (evil) Chinese government to spy on the righteous.

It was an unusually sensational piece for Bloomberg, complete with a fake animation zooming in on a cartoon-styled motherboard, suggesting that Bloomberg knew, as a matter of fact, where the alleged chip was placed. They even showed the chip placed on top of a finger. I’d call it deceptive, because Bloomberg demonstrably did not have any physical evidence of the chip, so the motherboard zoom-in and finger-chip were fabrications. If I discovered a “rogue” chip on any of my devices, I can assure you, I would keep the evidence around. What person discovers a rogue chip on a motherboard, and then just discard it?

Because it’s very difficult, and often impossible to prove a negative, the burden of proof is on the accuser. It’s too easy to say that people roaming the certain internet forum is actually a front for exchange of immoral and perverse videos. The admin of the forum and its members would deny the allegations, and I’d just say – “of course they are denying it, it would destroy their business and reputation if they didn’t deny it”, and I would then demand that they prove they never exchanged sick videos. Can’t be done.

It all brings memories of Stephen Glass.

Does that mean that it is inconceivable that hardware from China is bugged? No, nor does it mean that evidence will never surface. All it means is that if you’re buying into the Bloomberg story, then you’re probably part of the problem.

It’s a problem when people start believe gossip simply because it supports their belief. Don’t like/can’t compete with the Chinese, then you’re likely to believe some gossip about “spy chips” that no-one so far has been able to prove existed.

At the same time, when there are vulnerabilities in chipsets from Intel, then that’s just an honest mistake.

I don’t trust anything, and you shouldn’t either. Instead, you should spend less time obsessing over gossip (as entertaining as it might be), and instead educate yourself on how to protect yourself from eavesdropping. I’m not suggesting you’ll ever get 100% security when dealing with computers – and I don’t care who the manufacturer is. Things are put together by humans, and we make mistakes (or perhaps we have a fallout with former allies who then promptly leaks our secrets), so it’s on you to take precautions.

Stay safe, and don’t spread rumors and gossip. Reserve judgment until you see the evidence, not before.

 

 

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