Do Managers in Software Companies Need to Code?

I think so.

The horrible truth is that there are good and bad coders, there are good and bad managers and there are easy and hard projects.

A project, taken on by good coders and good managers can fail simply because the project was too complex and was too intertwined with system that the team had no control over. You could argue that the team never should have taken on the task, but that’s why you warn the customer of the risk of non-completion and bill by the hour.

When doing research on the skills needed to be a good software project manager, there seems to be an implied truth that the coders simply do what they are told, and that coding/design errors are always the managers fault. At the same time, you’ll find that people complain about micromanagement, and not letting the coders find their own solution. I find these two statements at odds with one another.

Coders will sometimes do things that are just wrong, yet it still “works”. How do you handle these situations? Do you, as a manager insists that the work is done “correctly”, which the coder may think is just a matter of taste, and not correct vs incorrect? Or do you leave the smelly code in there, and keep the peace?

If you don’t know how to code, and you’re the manager, you won’t even notice that the code is bad. You’ll be happy that it “works”. Over time, though, the cost of bad code will weigh down on productivity, the errors start piling up, good coders leave as there is no reward for good quality and they’re fed up with refactoring shitty code. If you have great coders, you might not run into that situation, but how do you know if you have great coders if you can’t code?

Maybe you’re the best coder in the world, and you’re in a managerial position facing some smelly code, you might consider two approaches: scold the coder(s), and demand that they do it the “correct” way (which is then interpreted as micromanagement), or alternatively, if you’re exhausted from the discussions, you just do a refactor yourself on a Sunday, while the kids are in the park?

In the real world, though, the best solution is for the manager to have decent coding skills, and posses that rare ability to argue convincingly. The latter is very hard to do if you do not understand the art of coding. Furthermore I don’t think coders are uniquely handicapped in being persuasive and certainly not when dealing with other coders (n00b managers wearing a tie are universally despised in the coding world).

Every coder is different, and act differently depending on the time of day, week or year. Some coders have not fully matured, some are a little too ripe, and some just like to do things the way they always did (or “at my old job we…”), different approaches are needed to persuade different people.

I must confess that this is what I have observed, the few times I have been wearing anything with any resemblance to a managerial hat, I have walked away being universally despised and feared as some sort of “Eye of Sauron” who picks up on the smallest error with no mercy when dishing out insults, but in theory at least, I think I know how thing ought to be.

So,if you are managing software projects and interacting with coders, you need to know how to code.

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Author: prescienta

Prescientas ruler

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