Why Products Go Bad

The simpleton will equate commercial success with quality.

I don’t.

A product can be well made, even if it is not commercially successful and vice versa. The Microsoft Zune HD, for example, was a great product. Hell, Microsoft’s Phone OS is/was good too. In contrast, Kinect is/was a terrible product. It promised the world, and it was shit. Johnny Lee proved that Nintendo’s controllers were fucking awesome, and Microsoft wanted some of that goodness. Most people at Microsoft knew how piss poor Kinect was, most devs knew too, but  management did not want to be upstaged by Nintendo, so they released this fine piece of junk. Molyneux flat out lied about the capabilities of the thing (and he was not the only one I’m sure).

Sometimes, and perhaps too often, see products that have the potential to be “good”, and perhaps they are already good, but then, gradually as time passes and new generations of the product are released, it turns to utter crap. Why does this happen? You would expect the opposite to be true. You’d expect that the next generation of a product improved on the old.

My own experience is that I am generally considered “an overthinker”. Instead of just shutting up and doing what “the customer asks”, I think about the ramifications over the longer term. I try to interpret what the real problem is, and I spend a long time thinking about a good solution. I spend a lot of time talking about the problem with my peers, drawing on whiteboards. I think about the issues as I drive drove to the office, while I fly flew across the Atlantic. And sometimes, I change my mind. Sometimes, after long discussion, after “everyone agrees”, I see things in a new light and change my mind. And it pisses people off.

In the general population, I believe that there is a large percentage who just want to be told what to do, do what they are told and then at 5.15 pm drive home and watch TV, happy and content that they did what they were told all day. To the majority, “a good day” is doing as much of what you’re being told as possible, regardless of what the task is. They do not want to be interrupted by assholes that can’t offer them a promotion or a raise, who critique the “what” or the “how” – regardless of merit. The “customer” to them, is not the user of the product, the “customer” is their immediate supervisor. Make that guy happy, and you move upwards.

Telling people that unchecking “always” does not mean “never” makes people angry. They can understand the logic (not always = sometimes), but they are angry that you can’t understand that their career is jeopardized if they pointed that out when their supervisor told them to make that change. They will correct the problem if a supervisor tells them to – even if screams them in the face that this is useless to the end user. Doesn’t matter. The end user does not dish out promotions or raise their salary.

As these non-thinkers move up, they get to supervise people like me (JH: No, this has not happened at OnSSI). And that’s where it gets really bad. Now they are in a position where they are told what to do, and they are telling someone else to do that thing (nirvana), and then they learn that the asshole doesn’t want to listen and do what he is told, like “everyone else” does, so eventually the “overthinker” is replaced with a non-thinker, and this continues until all the thinkers are gone, and the company or branch then does exactly what the customer asks.

When you see features that flat out do not work and never did work, and there’s no motivation to fix that issue, then you have to pause, and consider if you have enough thinkers among the non-thinkers.

Because you need both.

You need lying sales and marketing people (that know just how far the truth can be stretched, or who can make a reality distortion field), you need asshole genius programmers who knows iOS, gstreamer, ffmpeg and Qt, you need vain and arrogant designers who can draw the best damn icons and keep everything consistent across the apps, you need dried up, mummified sysops to run IT.

But most of all, you need to make sure that these people think, and care about the end user, instead of just title on their business-card.

 

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One thought on “Why Products Go Bad

  1. […] and here, and here  and many other places. I have mused over how companies can improve and what danger signs to look for. I have critiqued buzz-word-driven development (as a response to VR goggles being passed out at a […]

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