NVR Integration and PSIM

Axis makes cameras, and now they make access control systems and an NVR too. Should the traditional NVR vendors be concerned about it?

Clearly, the Axis NVR team is better positioned to fully exploit all the features of the cameras. Furthermore, the Axis only NVR does not have to spend (waste?) time, trying to fit all sorts of shapes into a round hole. They ONLY have to deal with their own hardware platforms. This is similar to Apple’s OS X that runs so smoothly because the number of hardware permutations are fairly limited.

What if Sony did the same? Come to think of it, Sony already has an NVR. But, it’s no stretch of the imagination to realize that a Sony NVR would support Sony cameras better than the “our NVR does everything”-type.

In fact, when you really look at the problem, an NVR is a proprietary database, and some protocol conversion. To move a PTZ camera, you need to issue various different commands depending on the camera, but the end result is always the same: the camera moves up. Writing a good database engine is really, really hard, but once you have a good one, it is hard to improve. The client and administration tools continue to evolve, and become increasingly complex.

Once it becomes trivial to do the conversion, then any bedroom developer will be able to create a small NVR. Probably very limited functionality, but very cheap.

The cheap NVR might have a simple interface, but what if you could get an advanced interface on top of that cheap NVR? What if you could mix cheap NVRs with NVRs provided by the camera manufacturers, and then throw in access control to the mix? You get the picture.

If you are an NVR vendor, it is going to be an uphill battle to support “foreign” NVRs. If Milestone decided to support Genetec, it would take 5 minutes for Genetec to break that compatibility and have Milestone scramble to update their driver. Furthermore, the end user would have to pay for two licenses, and the experience would probably be terrible.

The next time an NVR vendor says “we are an open architecture”, then take a look at their docs. If the docs do not describe interoperability with a foreign client, then they are not open. An ActiveX control does NOT equate “open”. Genetec could easily support the Milestone recorders too, but it would be cheaper and easier for Genetec to simply replace existing Milestone recorders for free (like a cuckoo chick).

In this market, you cannot get a monopoly and charge a premium. The “need to have” threshold is pretty low, and if you charge too much, someone will make a new, sufficient system and underbid you. Ultimately, NVRs might come bundled with the camera for free.

So, what about PSIM? Well, we started with DVR (which is really a good enough description of what it is), but then we decided to call it an NVR to distance ourselves from the – clearly inferior DVR. Then we weren’t satisfied with that, so then it became VMS. Sure, we added some bells and whistles along the way (we had mapping and videowall in NetSwitcher eons ago), so now we call it PSIM. It does the same as the old DVR. I think this kind of thing is called “marketing”.

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